<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 20 October 2014 16:16, Owen Taylor <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:otaylor@redhat.com" target="_blank">otaylor@redhat.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On Mon, 2014-10-20 at 10:37 -0400, Christian Schaller wrote:<br>
&gt; &gt; From: &quot;Owen Taylor&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:otaylor@redhat.com">otaylor@redhat.com</a>&gt;<br>
&gt; &gt; We can obviously ignore all of this and put a logo onto the top bar<br>
&gt; &gt; anyways case, but it&#39;s an unfriendly action towards GNOME on the part of<br>
&gt; &gt; Fedora. And is especially problematical because Fedora *is* seen as very<br>
&gt; &gt; closely associated with GNOME, and at that point it becomes nearly<br>
&gt; &gt; impossible to convince any other distro not to put their logos there as<br>
&gt; &gt; well.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; I think calling it an unfriendly action towards GNOME is overstating it.<br>
&gt; Fedora is a separate thing and is not beholden to any of its upstream<br>
&gt; communities, including GNOME. We try to align as much as possible with our<br>
&gt; upstreams because it makes sense, not because having our own ideas<br>
&gt; is by definition hostile towards someone else. To me this is almost the<br>
&gt; same argument that people make about shipping various desktops, that<br>
&gt; somehow not shipping desktop XYZ is somehow &#39;hostile&#39; towards said<br>
&gt; desktop. It is not, regardless of discussing branding of the desktop we<br>
&gt; ship or which desktop to ship, our choice is about what is right for us<br>
&gt; given our requirements and resources, not about trying to &#39;hurt&#39; someone<br>
&gt; else.<br>
<br>
If we took, say, Inkscape, and patched it to put a Fedora logo in the<br>
middle of the toolbox, it would clearly be seen as poorly representing<br>
Inkscape. If Fedora was the most common way that people obtained and<br>
tried out Inkscape, I&#39;d expect that people working on Inkscape might be<br>
upset - even if the goal of putting the logo there wasn&#39;t to provoke the<br>
Inkscape developers. (I said &quot;unfriendly&quot; not &quot;hostile&quot;)<br>
<br>
There are certainly ways that Fedora branding can be increased in the<br>
desktop which do make sense within the overall desktop design. I&#39;m<br>
interested to see what Mo and Ryan come up with and I&#39;m sure they&#39;ll do<br>
a good job. But I think it&#39;s important to realize that if we put<br>
constraints onto the end goal - in particular if we require      branding<br>
that is continually visible - then there is an inherent conflict.<br>
<div></div></blockquote><div> </div><div>Speaking as a lowly user my primary reason for using Fedora is that
 it packages a great GNOME Shell experience that&#39;s as close as possible 
to the design goals of the GNOME team. I think that alone is a good 
(almost unique) selling-point for Fedora, without Fedora having to add 
value on top of what GNOME provides. Put another way, I use Fedora to 
escape distro-specific meddling with the desktop environment.<br><br></div><div>It
 seems to me that the GNOME team has put a lot of thought into creating a
 distraction-free environment to work in, so I agree that compromising 
those efforts in order to provide persistent branding could be 
interpreted as &#39;unfriendly&#39;. Then again, any GNOME folks reaching that conclusion need only review this thread to understand that&#39;s not Fedora&#39;s intent, and that here we&#39;re trying to fulfil a legitimate goal without running rough-shod over upstream&#39;s work.<br><br></div>Having said all that, I don&#39;t really think that replacing the word &quot;Activities&quot; with a Fedora logo would bad
 be at all. &quot;Activities&quot; isn&#39;t a great term to describe what happens 
when one clicks there; it&#39;s almost impossible to find a single word to 
describe all that functionality. I suspect that the Window&#39;s Start 
Button is precedent enough for putting the Activities functionality 
behind a logo instead of a place-holder word, and there&#39;s plenty of 
precedent with other Linux desktop environments, including GNOME 2.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">Realistically it seems that the login screen, wallpaper and Activities corner are the only practical options. There&#39;s plenty of room on the login screen for a logo, and to my mind adding one wouldn&#39;t detrimentally affect the user-experience. I haven&#39;t taken the time to understand the legal implications of having a logo on the wallpaper, but it does seem like a logical thing to do and surely legal restrictions can be dealt with...? If the Activities corner logo was implemented as a Shell extension then objectors could remove it and Shell need not be patched to provide the logo.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">To be honest I don&#39;t really understand what all the fuss is about.<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">&quot;Racing turtles, the grapefruit is winning...&quot;</div>
</div></div>