<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Dne 8.11.2014 v 14:23 Björn Persson
      napsal(a):<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:20141108142346.58a8c518@hactar.xn--rombobjrn-67a.se"
      type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">Tomasz Torcz wrote:
</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre wrap="">On Fri, Nov 07, 2014 at 03:37:53PM +0100, Björn Persson wrote:
</pre>
        <blockquote type="cite">
          <pre wrap="">Vít Ondruch <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:vondruch@redhat.com">&lt;vondruch@redhat.com&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre>
          <blockquote type="cite">
            <pre wrap="">* I don't understand why my Xchat should loose connection, when I
am switching from ethernet to WiFi (and they are both available
during interim period).
</pre>
          </blockquote>
          <pre wrap="">
For this use case you want to run IRC over SCTP, so that you can keep
the connection open when you change IP addresses. The best that can
be done with TCP is to automatically reconnect from the new IP
address when the old TCP connection breaks.
</pre>
        </blockquote>
        <pre wrap="">
 Why different address?  If this the same machine, it would be much
easier
just to configure DHCP to give the same IPv4 for both wifi and wired
interface.
</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre wrap="">
That works only for the special case where you're moving around inside
an office (or a geek's home) where the wired and wireless networks
share an IP address range.</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    This would be good start from my POV. IP address should identify
    machine, network interfaces are identified by their MAC addresses
    ...<br>
    <br>
    Vít<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:20141108142346.58a8c518@hactar.xn--rombobjrn-67a.se"
      type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">If you're moving between your home, your
office, public hotspots, trains and whatnot, then there's no way you'll
be able to keep the same IP address without workarounds like tunneling.
(Well I suppose you could just use an LTE connection all the time, but
Vít's question was about switching network connections.)

</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite">
        <pre wrap=""> IPv6 stateless configured addresses are problematic, of course.
</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre wrap="">
If you have DHCP then you can have DHCPv6 too. IPv6 has the potential
to be less problematic than IPv4 because it doesn't need address
translation. I just hope people aren't so accustomed to being crippled
by address translation that they start translating IPv6 addresses
everywhere by habit.

</pre>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>