<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><div><div>Michael,<br><br></div>Thanks for sharing that.<br><br>I think it&#39;d be the best to go with the flow. That is, use the QT GUI. In the long run I think it is best to avoid maintaining multiple packages. I haven&#39;t seen the new QT GUI to be honest, it might be ugly, but still :)<br></div><br></div>Perhaps if there is too much rage about it, we can maintain also an audacious gtk2 version (or someone else can :). I&#39;d advise against it though. Maybe we should open it to the devel list?<br><br></div><div>Is it possible to compile audacious on its own and then supply gtk3 and qt packages on top of it? Sounds like it might be difficult to maintain such a thing.<br></div><div><br></div>Cheers,<br></div>Dan.<br><div><div><div><br><br></div></div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 2, 2015 at 1:45 AM, Michael Schwendt <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mschwendt@gmail.com" target="_blank">mschwendt@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Audacious 3.6 has been released.<br>
<br>
This is another chance for interested people to join and help deciding how<br>
to proceed with the Fedora packages. I&#39;m still looking for co-maintainers,<br>
too, especially some who have an opinion on how to package it.<br>
<br>
I&#39;ve been building pre-releases for it via Fedora Copr<br>
( <a href="https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/mschwendt/audacious-next/" target="_blank">https://copr.fedoraproject.org/coprs/mschwendt/audacious-next/</a> )<br>
but don&#39;t know whether anyone else has played with those yet (minus the<br>
MP3&#39;n&#39;similar plugins, of course, which are not available).<br>
<br>
<br>
Audacious 3.6 has changed the used programming language from C to C++.<br>
This also affects the Plugin API again, of course.<br>
<br>
<br>
It offers new GUI options for us to choose from:<br>
<br>
 1) The developers have introduced a Qt 5 based GUI that can coexist<br>
    with the GTK+ GUI. It&#39;s called experimental, since it&#39;s not as<br>
    feature-rich as the GTK+ GUI yet.<br>
<br>
    It&#39;s a long-time goal to switch to Qt, however:<br>
    <a href="http://redmine.audacious-media-player.org/boards/1/topics/1269" target="_blank">http://redmine.audacious-media-player.org/boards/1/topics/1269</a><br>
<br>
 2) The developers are unhappy with gtk3 and have returned to gtk2.<br>
    Currently, they offer _two_ different source tarballs, as they still<br>
    support gtk3, too, and some of the changes are not done conditionally<br>
    in the source code.<br>
<br>
They write:<br>
<br>
  | Audacious can still be built with GTK3 if desired,<br>
  | but we recommend the GTK2 variant for any desktop environment<br>
  | other than GNOME 3.<br>
<br>
Which _would_ open the possibility to build both, but I don&#39;t think<br>
that would be worth the trouble (implicit conflicts in libs and packaged<br>
files - the necessity to work around the conflicts somehow, since they<br>
are forbidden if following Fedora&#39;s guidelines - the necessity to add<br>
explicit inter-dependencies between packages, and most users would still<br>
only install &quot;audacious&quot; and not an optional &quot;audacious-gtk2&quot; or such).<br>
<br>
<br>
Enabling the Qt GUI would link Audacious core libraries with Qt by default<br>
in addition to GTK+ and GLib. That has the potential to annoy Qt haters,<br>
and Qt fans might be upset about the gtk3 dependency, too.<br>
<br>
Comments, anyone?<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>