modprobe.conf: what should be in there.... ?

Tom London selinux at gmail.com
Mon Mar 17 18:07:43 UTC 2008


On Mon, Mar 17, 2008 at 10:59 AM, Todd Denniston
<Todd.Denniston at ssa.crane.navy.mil> wrote:
> Tom London wrote, On 03/14/2008 02:47 PM:
>
>
> > On Fri, Mar 14, 2008 at 11:20 AM, Bill Nottingham <notting at redhat.com> wrote:
>  >> Tom London (selinux at gmail.com) said:
>  >>  > So I'm curious..... what actually needs to be in modprobe.conf?
>  >>  >
>  >>  > Here is the one currently installed:
>  >>  >
>  >>  > alias scsi_hostadapter ahci
>  >>  > options snd cards_limit=8
>  >>  > alias snd-card-0 snd-hda-intel
>  >>  > alias snd-card-1 snd-usb-audio
>  >>  > options snd-hda-intel index=0
>  >>  > options snd-usb-audio index=1
>  >>  > remove snd-hda-intel { /sbin/salsa -s 0 >/dev/null 2>&1 || : ; };
>  >>  > /sbin/modprobe -r --ignore-remove snd-hda-intel
>  >>  > alias eth0 e1000
>  >>  >
>  >>  > Are any of these really needed?
>  >>
>  >>  No. The remove line for snd-hda-uintel actually does something useful,
>  >>  but considering you're very unlikely to actually remove the module...
>  >>
>  >>  Bill
>  >
>  > Cool.  I renamed /etc/modprobe.conf to /etc/modprobe.conf.last and rebooted.
>  >
>  > Haven't noticed any issues: network is up (as eth0 even!), and
>  > pulseaudio/sound came up as well.
>  >
>  > One fewer thing to maintain is always good!
>  >
>  > I don't remember who/when the "scsi_hostadapter" line got inserted,
>  > but I'm presuming the new stuff will "just work" with USB hard drives,
>  > etc.
>  >
>  > Thanks!
>  >
>  > tom
>  >
>
>  Careful,
>  I have had issues in the past where I wanted to test changes to modprobe.conf
>  for some scsi settings...
>  I learned that (at least with some older systems, not sure about current ones)
>  the contents of modprobe.conf get [put into||used in the building of] the
>  initrd and until you build a new initrd the old settings continue to get used.
>
>  suggestion, make a backup of your current initrd and build a new one, then reboot.
>
>  Assuming the running kernel is the wan you want to do it for, then something like:
>  cp -p /boot/initrd-`uname -r`.img \
>         /boot/initrd-`uname -r`.img.worked
>  /sbin/new-kernel-pkg --package kernel \
>         --mkinitrd --depmod --install `uname -r`
>
>  use with care, and you may want to add a grub entry that uses the same kernel
>  and the ".worked" initrd, in case you need to get back where you are now.
>
Thanks for the warning, but I'm guessing the "new" mkinird tools
handle this correctly: I updated to
kernel-2.6.25-0.121.rc5.git4.fc9.i686 after I did the above renaming,
and I can boot without issue.

tom
-- 
Tom London




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