Ok, i really got confused. I have some other basic doubts which are as follows:<br><br>1. If by mistake or unfortunately, the password is typed wrong two or
three times at the time while PC restarts (the password set via BIOS),
are there chances that the system may be locked or any other problem
may come? and the same question for grub.conf encrypted passwords.<br><br>2. For disabling<span> Ctrl+Alt+Del from restarting computer in Console mode</span><a name="1293a7ed95ac8c60_12929d6bdb052e2c_p2"></a><font face="Geneva, Verdana, Arial, Sans-Serif" size="-1"><a name="1293a7ed95ac8c60_12929d6bdb052e2c_p2"></a></font>, all we have to do is uncommenting the line:<br>

<br><pre>ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now<br><br></pre>in the /etc/inittab file. But my /etc/inittab file yields the output:<br><br>*****<br><br># inittab is only used by upstart for the default runlevel.<br>

#<br># ADDING OTHER CONFIGURATION HERE WILL HAVE NO EFFECT ON YOUR SYSTEM.<br>#<br># System initialization is started by /etc/event.d/rcS<br>#<br># Individual runlevels are started by /etc/event.d/rc[0-6]<br>#<br># Ctrl-Alt-Delete is handled by /etc/event.d/control-alt-<div id=":7p" class="ii gt">
delete<br>
#<br># Terminal gettys (tty[1-6]) are handled by /etc/event.d/tty[1-6] and<br># /etc/event.d/serial<br>#<br># For information on how to write upstart event handlers, or how<br># upstart works, see init(8), initctl(8), and events(5).<br>

#<br># Default runlevel. The runlevels used are:<br>#   0 - halt (Do NOT set initdefault to this)<br>#   1 - Single user mode<br>#   2 - Multiuser, without NFS (The same as 3, if you do not have networking)<br>#   3 - Full multiuser mode<br>

#   4 - unused<br>#   5 - X11<br>#   6 - reboot (Do NOT set initdefault to this)<br># <br>id:5:initdefault:<br><br>*****<br><br>where there is no line as &#39;<pre>ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now&#39;.<br>
<br></pre>So how could it be done?<br><br>thx.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">---------- Forwarded message ----------<br>

From: Tim &lt;<a href="mailto:ignored_mailbox@yahoo.com.au" target="_blank">ignored_mailbox@yahoo.com.au</a>&gt;<br>
To: Community support for Fedora users &lt;<a href="mailto:users@lists.fedoraproject.org" target="_blank">users@lists.fedoraproject.org</a>&gt;<br>Date: Tue, 15 Jun 2010 04:00:25 +0930<br>Subject: Re: Subject: Subject: Re: Amazing problem of /boot<br>


On Mon, 2010-06-14 at 18:33 +0530, Parshwa Murdia wrote:<br>
&gt; but if we have more kernels, it occupies more space, may be less,<br>
&gt; though it may be good for testing purpose but for disk utility is it<br>
&gt; okay always to have more than one kernel?<br>
<br>
I think some meaning is getting lost in translation.<br>
<br>
Unless you&#39;re running out of free space, or updates take too long to<br>
complete (as the computer has more files to compare), it&#39;s useful to<br>
keep more kernels.  Only the one that you booted from is used, at the<br>
time.<br>
<br>
--<br>
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -r<br>
2.6.27.25-78.2.56.fc9.i686<br>
<br>
Don&#39;t send private replies to my address, the mailbox is ignored.  I<br>
read messages from the public lists.</blockquote></div></div>